WS 175W - History of Gender, Sex, and Sexuality in a Global Perspective up to 1500 CE

Fall 2017

Online via Laulima

Lucy L Jones, PhD, CSAC

lucyj@hawaii.edu

Office – Pālamanui C-151

 

THIS IS A WRITING INTENSIVE COURSE!

 

Required Textbooks:

1) Sarah Shaver Hughes and Brady Hughes, Women in World History, Volume 1 – Readings from Prehistory to 1500 (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1995) ISBN: 978-1-56324-311-0

 2) Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, Gender in History: Global Perspectives (Malden MA: John Wiley & Sons, 2011 2nd edition) ISBN: 978-1-4051-8995-8

3) World History textbook will be online and information will be given the first week of class.

 

In Addition: There will be weekly assigned essays that are historical, multicultural, sociological, and anthropological in approach, and will include ancient writings about gender and gender issues. In an attempt to make this period of history come alive for you, there will be various YouTube videos, DVDs, articles, mp3s, and more.

 

Course Description: This course will take a new look at the history of the world using a gender perspective. We will investigate how social, economic, and religious transformations shaped concepts of gender, sex, and sexuality, and how in turn, these identities shaped the history of civilizations and continue to influence our world today. We will touch on events and developments in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Americas, and Oceania, and gain a basic acquaintance with world civilizations to approximately 1500 CE.

 

Prerequisites:  Completion of English 100

 

General Education Learning Outcomes:

Š       Critical thinking:  Make informed decisions through analyzing and evaluating information.

Š       Self and Community:  Engage in activities demonstrating understanding of one’s relationship with one’s communities and environments.

Š       Cultural Diversity:  Articulate and demonstrate an awareness and sensitivity to cultural diversity.

 

Student Learning Outcomes:

Š       Apply history and gender perspectives to contemporary frames of reference, identities, and aspirations through writing.

Š       Demonstrate understanding of world history from a gender perspective and its meaning in our lives through weekly writing and/or discussion.

 

Course Objectives:

Š       Investigate how social, economic, and religious transformations shaped concepts of gender, sex, and sexuality, and how in turn, these identities shaped the history of civilizations and continue to influence our world today.

Š       Critically examine historical events from prehistory up to approximately 1500 CE in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Americas, and Oceania through an analysis of readings and videos from a gendered perspective.

 

Course Requirements:

Š       Check into our virtual classroom at least three (3) times per week just as you would if you were attending a traditional face-to-face class.

Š       There are specific due dates listed in each module. The deadline for all online submissions is just prior to midnight of the due date (the exact cutoff time is 11:55 pm). If assignments are not submitted by the due dates, they will receive an automatic zero (0), unless you work it out with me before hand (surgery, emergencies, and the like).

Š       For all assignments, you will be expected to use correct English, including spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

Š       There will be words and concepts in the readings, which you may not be familiar with. This is a college level course and you are expected to be able to do independent work, including looking up words and concepts you may not be familiar with. If you have done your best to research definitions and concepts, you may consult with me via email or check with other students on the “Discussions” page under “Questions.”

Š       Class discussions are a necessary part of any face-to-face class. Since we will be trying to replicate a regular classroom, I will expect a discussion among class members, which counts as “participation.”

Š       Each week, through assigned readings and videos, you will critically review the relevant period of history and write a 500 word essay that demonstrates your understanding of what it means to look at world history today from a gender perspective. These weekly essays require you to contrast and compare various aspects of historical eras, such as religion, community life, treatment of women and third genders, migration, trade and economics, development of patriarchy, politics, and more. In these essays, you will analyze your gathered information, ideas, and insights to share with the class.

 

Final Research Project: A final research paper is to be presented that focuses on a particular geographical area, time period, and issue that is of interest to you. This topic is chosen in consultation with the instructor. This paper is designed to evaluate your comprehension of how social, economic, or religious transformations shaped concepts of gender, sex, and sexuality, and how in turn, these identities shaped the history of civilizations and continue to influence our world today.

 

As we go through the centuries this semester, I’d like you to think about what particular time period grabs your interest . . .OR you might be interested in investigating more about the history of one particular country . . . OR you might like to take one aspect of life and follow it through the centuries. Your project might cover something that I have neglected in preparing this course.

 

This paper is to be 4-5 pages, complete with references, and remember that each page runs approximately 250 words. Please use 12 font in either Arial or Times New Roman, and standard margins. Use only black and no fancy fonts. Whatever you choose, be thinking about it from the very beginning of the semester. By the middle of the semester, I would like you to let me know what you have decided to do. Even if you don’t have it completely worked out yet, you need to have a general idea of where you’re going with your final research project. Talk with me about your ideas because I may be able to help you, or even be able to recommend a book or two for your research. This is due by December 15, no exceptions.

 

Meet with me (a requirement):

At least once during the semester you are required to meet with me to discuss your chosen topic for the final research paper. I live on the Kona side of the Big Island, but I make periodic visits to the other islands. If you live somewhere other than the Big Island, we can make arrangements to meet when I will be on your island. If you have access to Skype, this can be a way to discuss your work or questions you have. My Skype address is lucy.lee.jones. I also have Facetime for Mac users. Contact me for my information.

 

Discussions: By the due date of each assigned module:

Š       You will give a quality response to at least two of the other students’ reflections or posts. This will constitute your participation grade.

Š       Please read http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.html in order to learn “netiquette.”

Š       I probably will take part in these discussions, but not all the time. I will, however, be responding to each of the assignments, sometimes individually and sometimes collectively.

 

Technology and Online Requirements: This is an online class and will require time and commitment, dependable Internet access, and minimal technical skills. You must have a broadband connection (no dial-up), and MS Word (not MS Works) or PDF reader. Safari (for Mac) is not adequate for this work, so please download Mozilla Firefox as your Internet browser. Please allow extra time for cyber glitches, and don’t wait until the last minute to turn in your work. Some assignments will require more than a cursory reading at the end of the week.

 

Introductions: As part of class participation, you are required to prepare an introduction. You will do this by posting to the “Introductions” folder on the Discussion page. Please include a recognizable photo (I need to be able to recognize you on the street!) and introduce yourself (minimum 100 words), but do NOT include your phone number, address, or other private details.

 

Where to put your work: Written work for assignments will have specifically labeled folders on the “Discussion” page.

 

Modules: This course is divided into sixteen modules with a specific topic in each module. Each week, check the module for:

Š       Reading Assignment

Š       Written Assignment

Š       Participation

 

Laulima: Participation online is essential. The course site will be used in a variety of ways: posting notes, facilitating group discussion, sharing of information and resources, ideas and opinions; and to provide opportunities for critical reflection on the assigned reading material as well as our personal contributions. We will create a virtual community, recognizable by its commitment to exploring the layers and complexities of humanity. If you need assistance with Laulima, use the “Laulima Help” link on the left side.

 

Turnitin: You are to use Turnitin with each of your papers. The Class ID is 12459565 and the password is “ws175” (without the quotation marks). A document explaining the use of Turnitin is listed under Modules in case you are not familiar with it.

 

Announcements: Please check Laulima regularly for announcements. You can sign in using your school ID and password. Sometimes it will show up in your email, as well.

 

How to Contact me: You may either use “Messages” (see link on left), or my office (808-969-8849), or email (lucyj@hawaii.edu). I can receive texts on my cell phone (808-937-4131), also. Please leave a message if I don’t answer! It is impolite to just hang up without letting me know who called. I will return your call as soon as I possibly can.

 

Students With Verified Disabilities:

If you have a disability with verification on file with your Office of Students with Disabilities, please let me know if you think you will need accommodation. I will be glad to discuss it with you and with your Disabled Students’ Office.

 

Student Conduct Code and Other Policies:

Hawaii Community College has a Student Conduct Code that defines expected conduct and specifies those acts subject to University sanctions. You will find it in the school catalog (http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/catalog/). You are to be familiar with this code. You will find information regarding our "Policy on Sexual Harassment" and "Academic Grievances" in the school catalog.

 

MySuccess Program: At Hawai`i Community College we want every student to be successful.  The MySuccess program is a UHCC system-wide effort that seeks to support students early in the semester when they first begin experiencing difficulty in a class.  If I feel you are having difficulty in my class (ex. missing class, missing assignments, and low test scores) I may refer you to Support Services   Once referred, your counselor will follow up with you by phone or email to find out what kinds of help you might need, connect you with the necessary resources, and to help you develop a strategy for success.  You may find your Support Network in the MySuccess tab on your MyUH  page, or the MySuccess  tab linked to this course in Laulima.

 

There are 3 criteria for a Referral:

1.     Student must be demonstrating a pattern of behavior.

2.     The instructor has made attempts to address the behavior and/or academic concerns, but attempts have been unsuccessful or the student is not getting enough support.

3.     The student should need additional support, outside of what is provided in the classroom.

 

Semester Reflection:

At the end of the semester, you are to write a brief reflection of at least one thing you learned over the course of the semester that will benefit you in your personal and/or professional life. A class has no meaning unless it can be of some value other than merely a grade or three credits.

 

eCAFE: At the end of the semester, you will be given the opportunity to evaluate the course and instructor. I am giving a 10-point incentive if you let me know you have completed the survey. This can be screen shot, or copy of the completion. I don’t need to know how you answered the evaluation, but just that you did it.

 

Semester Grades

90-100% = A

80-89%   = B

70-79%   = C

60-69%   = D

0 – 59%  = F

 

Grades are based on the following:

Introduction = Up to 20 points

Reading Assignments and Reflections = Up to 20 points each

Meet with Me = 20 points

Final Research Paper = Up to 40 points

Participation = Up to 20 points each week

Semester Reflection = Up to 20 points

eCAFE completion = 10 points

 

 

WS 197 RUBRIC: Introductions, Reflections, Interview, Social Policy, Participation

 

 

Excellent (A)

Good (B)

Adequate (C)

Inadequate (D)

No Credit (F)

 

Introduction

 

Provided biographical details; correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation; photo AND overall excellence (20)

 

 

Provided biographical details; correct spelling, grammar, punctuation; photo (18)

 

Provided biographical details; correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation (16)

 

Provided biographical details; met length requirement; but incorrect spelling, grammar, or punctuation (12)

 

Late submission or not published by the due date (0)

 

Weekly Reading Reflections

 

Thoughtful & provocative response; met length requirements, correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation AND overall excellence, (20)

 

 

Thoughtful response; met length requirements

Correct spelling, grammar, punctuation (18)

 

Met length requirement; incorrect spelling, grammar, or punctuation (16)

 

Inadequate length, incorrect spelling, grammar, or punctuation (12)

 

Late submission or not published by the due date (0)

 

Research Paper

 

(I will give a rubric specific to the research paper)

 

Thoughtful & provocative issues; met length requirements; excellent concluding statement; correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation AND overall excellence, (40)

 

 

Thoughtful issues; met length requirements

Correct spelling, grammar, punctuation

(35)

 

Met length requirement; incorrect spelling, grammar, or punctuation

(30)

 

Inadequate length, incorrect spelling, grammar, or punctuation

(25)

 

Late submission or not published by the due date (0)

 

 

Participation

 

Met length requirement; correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation; thoughtful and provocative response (10)

 

 

Met length requirement; correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation; good response (8)

 

Met length requirement; correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation

(6)

 

Inadequate length, incorrect spelling, grammar, or punctuation

(4)

 

 

Late submission or not published by the due date (0)

 

 

Semester

Reflection

 

Thoughtful & provocative responses; correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation. Overall excellence (20)

 

 

Thoughtful responses; correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation

(18)

 

Simple response; correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation

(16)

 

Inadequate response; incorrect grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

(12)

 

Late submission or not published by the due date (0)

 

TENTATIVE TOPICS AND SCHEDULE

 

MODULE 1:

History of Gender, Sex, and Sexuality in a Global Perspective to 1500 CE

            a. Introduction

            c. Breadth

            d. Relevance

 

MODULE 2:

Early Complex Societies and Gender Roles

            a. Agriculture

            b. Health

            c. Women

            d. "Civilization"

 

MODULE 3:

The Epic of Gilgamesh

            a. Meanings

            b. Messages

                                   

MODULE 4:

From Mesopotamia to Egypt

            a. Early African Societies

            b. Bantu Migrations

 

MODULE 5:

Early Societies

            a. South and East Asia

            b. Gender in Law

            c. Heroes and Heroines

 

MODULE 6:

Introduction to the Indigenous Americas

            a. The "Undiscovered"

 

MODULE 7:

The Creation and Persistence of Patriarchy

            a. The Empires of Persia, China, and India

 

MODULE 8:

Mediterranean Society

            a. The Greeks

            b. Tracing the Goddess

            c. Meanings and Messages in The Medea

 

MODULE 9:

Exchange on the Silk Road

              a. History

              b. Significance

 

MODULE 10:

"The Legacy of Israel"

            a. Religion

            b. Gender

 

MODULE 11:

Africa: Traders, Slaves, Sorcerers, and Queen Mothers

a.     The Black Diaspora

b.     Religion, Gender, and Slavery

c.     Slave women in the New World

 

MODULE 12:

Christian Western Europe During the Middle Ages

            a. Reconstructing

            b. Preserving

            c. Interpreting "artifacts" of history

 

MODULE 13:

Lovers, Mystics, Virgins, and Witches

            a. Colliding Worlds

 

MODULE 14:

Sexuality and "The Middle Ground"

            a. "Savagism and Civilization"

 

MODULE 15:

Gender and Dispossession in the "New" World

            a. Mediators

            b. Matriarchies

            c. Sexual Diplomacy

 

MODULE 16:

Final Project